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Dr. Joe Tatta | The Healing Pain Podcast

Chronic pain is a debilitating condition that affects one’s ability to live a full and active life and impacts both physical and emotional health. Whether you are living with chronic pain or a physical therapist or other health professional such as an occupational therapist, psychologist, social worker, nurse, or physician seeking information for treating pain, we invite you to join our global community. Welcome to The Healing Pain Podcast with Dr. Joe Tatta, a podcast that promotes the latest evidence and methods for the safe and effective treatment of chronic pain. Featuring top experts, we bring you the latest research from the fields of pain science, physical therapy, physiotherapy, pain psychology, functional nutrition, integrative and functional medicine, as well as discuss innovation and provide expert opinion every week. More and more patients are seeking integrative and comprehensive pain therapies that care for both their body as well as their mind. A biopsychosocial approach to the care of pain has arrived. Many realize that pain medications and surgery alone are not enough to address the root cause of their problems - such as fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease, CRPS, neuropathy, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Dr. Joe Tatta is a global leader in integrative pain care and an advocate for the safe and effective treatment of chronic pain. He is the Founder of the Integrative Pain Science Institute, a cutting-edge health company reinventing pain care through evidence-based treatment, research, and professional development. For 25 years he has supported people living with pain and helped practitioners deliver more effective pain management. His research and career achievements include scalable practice models centered on lifestyle medicine, health behavior change, and digital therapeutics. He is a Doctor of Physical Therapy, a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy trainer. Dr. Tatta is the author of two bestselling books Radical Relief and Heal Your Pain Now and host of The Healing Pain Podcast. Learn more by visiting www.integrativepainscienceinstitute.com. The Healing Pain Podcast is a great resource for patients suffering from chronic pain as well as for professionals seeking additional professional CEU credits and free continuing education on the most up-to-date information for treating pain based on a biopsychosocial model of pain care. The show covers a wide range of topics that will help you learn all about chronic pain management such us how clinicians can treat pain more effectively, learn how exercise and physical activity alleviates pain, the role nutrition plays in reversing and treating chronic pain, how to use mindfulness, cognitive behavioral therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy to treat many chronic conditions, and so much more! Chronic pain doesn’t have to be an obstacle in the highway of your life that makes you step on the brakes. Arm yourself with the knowledge on how you can better manage or even eliminate it so you can start living your best – and pain-free – life! Join The Healing Pain Podcast community today.
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Dr. Joe Tatta | The Healing Pain Podcast
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Now displaying: April, 2021
Apr 29, 2021

In this episode, we're going to do something different. Instead of me interviewing someone, I'm going to share a simple yet powerful technique that will help you whether you're someone living with pain or a practitioner who treats people. This exercise is called Dropping an Anchor. It's typically one of the very first techniques that I teach patients who suffer from pain or pain catastrophizing, having problems with difficult emotions, emotion dysregulation, anxiety or any challenge that's coming up in the therapy room. Before we begin, we probably should revisit the term pain catastrophizing and review and identify what that means. Pain catastrophizing is the tendency to magnify the threat value of pain, feel helpless in a context of pain or the inability to inhibit pain-related thoughts in anticipation of a painful encounter. The last part, the inability to inhibit pain-related thoughts in anticipation of a painful encounter, is what I would like you to think about as we go into this episode.

Think about someone who has chronic pain. Each time they come into your clinic, each time they come into the therapy room with you, they are in some way in anticipation that there may be some pain during that session. We're going to talk about pain. I may be moving or moving your arm. You may be experiencing pain. It's a lot of pain-related thoughts that are happening in anticipation of a treatment session. That's why we're going to go through this Dropping an Anchor exercise. If you've taken my ACT for Chronic Pain Course or my Mindfulness-Based Pain Relief Certification, you'll be able to identify that this type of exercise fits squarely in the psychological process of contacting the present moment. You'll also be able to identify some degree of cognitive defusion. Cognitive defusion is the idea of distancing or separating from thoughts. You'll definitely see aspects of both of those during this exercise.

There are lots of different ways you can drop an anchor. You can drop an anchor by focusing on your breath, by stretching, focusing on the rise and fall of the diaphragm, looking around the room and fixating on a point or listening to sounds in the room. You're going to hear all of those flavors now because I'm going to share a session that I had with a client that I worked with virtually. This whole encounter here that I'm going to share with you with my client, Barbara, I have her permission to share this. At the end of that exercise, I gave Barbara a while to debrief so we can talk through what she noticed and experienced during the activity.

Probably the most common mistake I see both therapists, as well as patients, make with this type of exercise is they attempt to use it as a control or a distraction technique. Control and distraction techniques are very opposite of what happens in mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches to pain. Mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches involve helping you turn toward what's in the present moment with an openness and a curiosity and not necessarily to distract, eliminate, control or avoid what's present.

I invite you to participate and play patient. If you're at home, find a comfortable chair to sit in. Any chair will do. You can do this as an eyes-open or eyes-closed exercise. It doesn't matter. I personally enjoy eyes-closed exercises like most people do with regard to cognitive and mindfulness exercises like this. If you're seated, all you have to do is place your palms down on your lap, relax your arms at your sides and gently begin to close your eyes. Let's get ready. I invite you to drop an anchor with us. Let's get started.

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Apr 22, 2021

We're discussing how to train entry-level physical therapists to address the opioid epidemic. My guest is Dr. Anne Swisher. She is a Professor and Director of Scholarship for the West Virginia Division of Physical Therapy. She's been a Board-Certified Cardiopulmonary Clinical Specialist for several years and has taught in the area of cardiopulmonary physical therapy, exercise prescription and pathophysiology. She's also a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association and has published over 80 peer reviewed publications. We focus on a paper Anne published called the Physical Therapist Roles During the Opioid Epidemic in Rural Appalachia: Preparing Students to Educate Communities.

Anne is working to address opioid misuse in what some may consider an unconventional way. She's enhanced physical therapy instruction at West Virginia University to emphasize the physical therapist's role in preventing and treating opioid use disorder. The reason why this is such an important topic is because the nexus of America's opioid epidemic isn’t where most people would expect. It's not in the big city such as New York, Chicago or Los Angeles. Instead, the hub of the epidemic is in rural states such as West Virginia. West Virginia has more than double the rate of opioid deaths in the national average and a 20% higher rate of opioid prescriptions written by providers.

On this episode, we discuss how to prepare future physical therapists to embrace advocacy roles related to opioid use disorder, the educational model and develop to guide physical therapy students regarding their roles across the spectrum of opioid use disorder. Also, how this model can serve as a guide for educating a variety of communities negatively impacted by the opioid epidemic, without further ado, let's begin. Let's meet Anne and learn how we can train entry-level physical therapists to address the opioid epidemic.

 

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Apr 14, 2021

We're diving deeper into the utility of Pain Neuroscience Education and investigating if it's enough to help people overcome pain when used as a single treatment modality or should it be folded into a more comprehensive multimodal pain treatment program? My guest is Rilind Shala who is a young scientist and a physical therapist from Kosovo. He conducts research with the prestigious Body and Mind Group and has earned many international accolades for his work in both physical therapy as well as pain management. In this episode, we cover how Pain Neuroscience Education is used in clinical practice, the clinical impact of Pain Neuroscience Education on outcomes such as kinesiophobia and pain catastrophizing, and the essential tools and techniques you can combine with Pain Neuroscience Education to prove its impact on quality of life. Let's get ready, let's begin and let's learn about Pain Neuroscience Education.

 

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