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Dr. Joe Tatta | The Healing Pain Podcast

Chronic pain is a debilitating condition that affects one’s ability to live a full and active life and impacts both physical and emotional health. Whether you are living with chronic pain or a physical therapist or other health professional such as an occupational therapist, psychologist, social worker, nurse, or physician seeking information for treating pain, we invite you to join our global community. Welcome to The Healing Pain Podcast with Dr. Joe Tatta, a podcast that promotes the latest evidence and methods for the safe and effective treatment of chronic pain. Featuring top experts, we bring you the latest research from the fields of pain science, physical therapy, physiotherapy, pain psychology, functional nutrition, integrative and functional medicine, as well as discuss innovation and provide expert opinion every week. More and more patients are seeking integrative and comprehensive pain therapies that care for both their body as well as their mind. A biopsychosocial approach to the care of pain has arrived. Many realize that pain medications and surgery alone are not enough to address the root cause of their problems - such as fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease, CRPS, neuropathy, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Dr. Joe Tatta is a global leader in integrative pain care and an advocate for the safe and effective treatment of chronic pain. He is the Founder of the Integrative Pain Science Institute, a cutting-edge health company reinventing pain care through evidence-based treatment, research, and professional development. For 25 years he has supported people living with pain and helped practitioners deliver more effective pain management. His research and career achievements include scalable practice models centered on lifestyle medicine, health behavior change, and digital therapeutics. He is a Doctor of Physical Therapy, a Board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy trainer. Dr. Tatta is the author of two bestselling books Radical Relief and Heal Your Pain Now and host of The Healing Pain Podcast. Learn more by visiting www.integrativepainscienceinstitute.com. The Healing Pain Podcast is a great resource for patients suffering from chronic pain as well as for professionals seeking additional professional CEU credits and free continuing education on the most up-to-date information for treating pain based on a biopsychosocial model of pain care. The show covers a wide range of topics that will help you learn all about chronic pain management such us how clinicians can treat pain more effectively, learn how exercise and physical activity alleviates pain, the role nutrition plays in reversing and treating chronic pain, how to use mindfulness, cognitive behavioral therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy to treat many chronic conditions, and so much more! Chronic pain doesn’t have to be an obstacle in the highway of your life that makes you step on the brakes. Arm yourself with the knowledge on how you can better manage or even eliminate it so you can start living your best – and pain-free – life! Join The Healing Pain Podcast community today.
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Dr. Joe Tatta | The Healing Pain Podcast
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Now displaying: March, 2022
Mar 30, 2022

In this episode, we are discussing embodied cognition and the role of bodily processes in thought. In the field of pain care, we strongly lean on theories of how the brain works and how we can use the nervous system to modulate pain. Many of these theories are rooted in the idea that the brain is the seat of cognition and views the brain as a CEO, which controls both thinking as well as our body.

However, newer theories such as embodied cognition take a different perspective which emphasizes the significance of the physical body in our cognitive abilities. Embodied cognition is a theory that draws on the work from the fields of psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, physiology, and even artificial intelligence. This new research points towards bodily processes in forming how our cognition is generated.

We are joined by Professor Rebecca Fincher-Kiefer, PhD, who is a Professor of Psychology at Gettysburg College and discusses the potential application of embodied cognition. Her research interests include the investigation of embodied cognition and how all that we know and understand is grounded in our bodies.

She's on the cutting edge of this field of study, which includes the publication of a textbook called How the Body Shapes Knowledge: Empirical Support for Embodied Cognition. In this episode, you will learn all about embodied cognition and its potential influence on pain, health, and human behavior. Without further ado, let's learn about embodied cognition and meet Professor Rebecca Fincher-Kiefer, PhD.

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Mar 23, 2022

In this episode, we're discussing how mindful movement can shift the experience of exercise or physical activity for people. This is important because the mindful movement can help people exercise in a way that is more fluid and easier, alleviate pain and with body image something they oftentimes struggle with when they begin an exercise program. Some of you may know that as a kid and adolescent and even into college, I was a gymnast. Mindful movement is something that was comfortable for me.

However, I didn't fully dive into what mindfulness was with regard to movement until about the year 1997. At my first job at St. Vincent's Medical Center, there was a free yoga class that was offered by a yoga studio down the block called Integral Yoga in New York City's Greenwich Village. It has wonderful yoga classes and I became hooked on yoga as a form of mindful movement. Although I've never become certified in yoga, I've done thousands of hours of many different types of yoga methods and techniques. I always recommend it for people with pain. Somewhere around the year 2000, I worked for a practice here in New York City that specialized in Sports and Performing Arts Medicine.

As part of that practice, we use the Pilates method of body conditioning for rehabilitating people with pain, as well as the performing artists and dancers that would come into our clinic. Moving with the mind or mindful movement is a big part of what Joseph Pilates created. He has five principles of mindful movement that he includes in his method, which is called Contrology. They include breathing, centering concentration control as well as precision. You see people bringing in these principles of movement into various types of movement methods and practices.

You'll meet Professor Anne Cox, whose research has been focused on understanding key determinants of physical activity-related behaviors as a professor and a researcher, has completed a 200-hour yoga teacher training and uses the knowledge of mindful movement to examine the effects of yoga on things like mindfulness, body image and the promotion of the physical activity.

In this episode, you'll learn all about mindful movement and how mindfulness shifts the experience of movement or physical activity? How does yoga increase mindfulness and how does being mindful affects body image or physical activity motivation? Without further ado, let's begin and meet Professor Anne Cox and learn how and why to add mindfulness to physical activity.

 

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Mar 16, 2022

We're going to talk about psychological aspects of pain rehabilitation that physical therapists perceive as important. When we're talking about research, a new topic or providing new information, oftentimes I'm talking to a pain researcher. It may be someone with a PhD or someone who is actively engaged in investigating different aspects of pain from a lifestyle and a biopsychosocial perspective.

In this episode, I'm introducing you to Alexa Knuth, who is a student physical therapist. Alexa is a student at Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, Scotland. She is in the last year of her program and she is excited to start a career. Even before she started her career, she had already started to delve into the evidence and contribute to the evidence base by writing a paper called Psychological Aspects of Rehabilitation as Perceived by Physical Therapists. You can all access that. It was published in 2018. I came across it and thought it was important to share with all of you so we're going to be talking about that on the show.

Alexa also has an interest in working with and applying psychological techniques to a specific patient population, which is those who are looking to self-manage inflammatory arthritis like rheumatoid arthritis. There are lots of great applications for this work here. We'll talk about that in this episode as well. Overall, we'll talk about the important psychological techniques people can use for self-management and which physical therapists perceive are the most important.

As you know, psychologically-based care or psychologically-informed physical therapy is something we often discuss on this show. We teach courses on that at the Integrative Pain Science Institute. You can go over and check out our courses as well as the newly released Psychologically-Informed Pain Practitioner Certification. That's a complete certification that discusses the different multimodal approaches that you can use with regard to cognitive and behavioral interventions as well as whole health interventions for treating people with chronic pain. Without further ado, let's begin and meet Alexa Knuth.

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Mar 2, 2022

In this episode, we are discussing perfectionism and stress in the physical therapy students. Stress and burnout in the PT profession are personal interests of mine. I have done some research and explored how to use ACT in preventing burnout and creating resiliency in physical therapists. We briefly explored this topic of perfectionism in episode 217 with physical therapist Andrea Moore. She is a PT who specializes in treating women in overcoming perfectionism, and the intersection between pain and perfectionism.

Perfectionism is often caused by having high standards or having a hypercritical evaluation of oneself. Some doctor or physical therapy students experience increased stress when they go through the rather rigorous academic coursework that we take in physical therapy schools. Yet there is limited research in understanding the intersection between stress and perfectionism in the PT students, what the successful behaviors are that these students have that help them manage this increased stress, especially those who are perfectionists coming into the program.

Here to discuss perfectionism and stress in the PT student is Professor Mike Richardson. He is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Hanover College. He is a Doctor of Health Science from the University of Indianapolis. His current research interests include perfectionism and stress among physical therapy students.

You will learn all about perfectionism and its prevalence among DPT students, perfectionism’s relationship to stress, and why it is important to better understand the relationship between stress and perfectionism. Finally, what can be done? What strategies can you employ if you are a DPT student or a physical therapist yourself who is looking at the impact of stress on your physical as well as mental well-being? Let's meet professor Mike Richardson and learn all about perfectionism and stress in physical therapy students.

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